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A ROADMAP FOR DRIVING LATER IN LIFE

Check out this information from AAA on senior driving for seniors and those who love them

http://www.minnesotatzd.org/ whatistzd/mntzd/ partners/mmap/documents/driving_later.pdf

 

CHECK OUT THIS WEBSITE AND BROCHURE THAT CAN BE DOWNLOADED IF YOU ARE A SENIOR DRIVER, HAVE A FAMILY MEMBER WHO IS A SEASONED DRIVER,  OR YOU JUST WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE LAWS OR FRESHEN UP ON YOUR DRIVING SKILLS


www.SeniorDriving.AAA.com is a comprehensive website for seasoned drivers and their families.
You’ll find tools that:
• evaluate and improve driving ability                      
• create awareness of mind and body changes
• help maintain mobility and independence
• keep you driving safely for as long as possible
 

8 Signs Your Senior Parent Should No Longer Be Driving

Getting older doesn’t have to mean that your parent can no longer drive. Senior driving allows seniors to maintain their independence, cultivate an active lifestyle, and sustain relationships with loved ones. Senior driving can also pose a serious danger when vision worsens, thinking isn’t what it used to be, and reflexes become slower. read more ............https://blog.arborcompany.com/8-signs-your-senior-parent-should-no-longer-be-driving
 
The Definitive List of Driving Safety Resources For Senior Drivers

Intersections are most dangerous for drivers over 70

Forty percent of the fatal collisions of people 70 and older, compared with 23% of the crashes of 35-54 year olds, occur at intersections and involve other vehicles. What mistakes are leading older motorists to get into intersection crashes? After studying 200 intersection crashes involving 3 age groups of drivers, age 70-79, age 80+, and 35-54  and talking to those older drivers who caused the crash the main reason found was that the older drivers fail to yield. The older the driver the higher the percentage of the cause was failure to yield. This is shown with these statistics; 26% for the 35 to 54 year olds, 37% for the 70 – 79 year olds and 58% for the 80+ drivers.
The 35 to 54 year old said the cause of the intersection crash was because they became distracted. The 70 -79 group said they saw the potentially conflicting vehicles but misjudged whether there was time to proceed. The 80+ group said they were looking but simply didn’t see the conflict. Mr. McCartt, the author of the study, said that the failure to see other vehicles “may be due to increase in vision impairment, which escalates rapidly after age 75. Another factor could involve the complexity of urban intersections with vehicles traveling in multiple directions. Older drivers may experience decreasing ability to process the multiple sources of information. Whatever the reason for the intersection crashes, those involving failure to yield occurred most often where traffic is controlled by stop signs rather than at intersections controlled by signal lights.
A 2002 study by the University of Kentucky found that each advancing year of age after 65 increases by 8% the odds of getting in a crash that involves turning left. Some ideas that might help include more roundabouts, and adding more green arrows for left turns.
This article was summarized from an article in Status Report Vol.42  No. 3 published by the Insurance Institute For Highway Safety
www.Seniordrivers.org is a website portal for senior drivers, their families, researchers, and alternative transportation providers.
http://www.seniordrivers.org/home/